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17% of CA teachers don’t have proper credentials, report finds

IN OTHER NEWS WE ARE GETTING OUR , FIRST LOOK AT TEACHER ASSIGNMENTS IN CALIFORNIA. GULSTAN: THE FIRST-EVER RELEASED REPORT FOUND 83% OF EDUCATORS HAVE THE PROPER CREDENTIALS TO TEACH THEIR SUBJECTS. BUT THAT MEANS 17% DO NOT. TY STEELE JOINS US TO BREAK DOWN THE REPORT. REPORTER: IT’S NOT THAT BAD NEWS. THE TEACHING ASSIGNMENT MONITORING REPORT BROKE DOWN HOW MANY OF CALIFORNIA’S EDUCATORS ARE QUALIFIED TO EDUCATE IN THE SUBJECT THEY ARE TEACHING IN. THERE’S FOUR MAIN CATEGORIES. 83% ARE IN THE CLEAR. MEANING THE CLASS OR COURSE IS TAUGHT BY A TEACHER WHO HAS A CREDENTIAL AND IS FULLY AUTHORIZED TO TEACH THE COURSE. THE NEXT IS CALLED OUT OF FIELD. 4% OF TEACHERS HAVE A CREDENTIAL BUT HAVE NOT DEMONSTRATED SUBJECT MATTER COMPETENCE. THE NEXT IS INTERN CREDENTIAL 1.5% OF TEACHERS ARE IN THIS CATEGORY. THAT MEANS TEACHERS ARE STILL COMPLETING THEIR TRAINING. AND FINALLY THE INEFFECTIVE CATEGORY. THE TEACHER IS AUTHORIZED BY AN EMERGENCY PERMIT. OR HOLDS A TEACHING CREDENTIAL BUT IS TEACHING OUTSIDE OF THEIR CREDENTIALED AREA WITHOUT AUTHORIZATION. OR HOLDS NO CREDENTIAL, PERMIT, OR AUTHORIZATION TO TEACH IN CALIFORNIA. LET’S BREAK IT DOWN BY FIVE SUBJECT MATTERS. 77% OF EDUCATORS TEACHING MATH HAVE THE PROPER CREDENTIALS TO TEACH THEIR SUBJECTS. 76% FOR SCIENCE. 82.4% FOR HISTORY. 74% OF EDUCATORS TEACHING ART HAVE THE PROPER CREDENTIALS TO IN THEIR SUBJECTS. AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION AT 74%. THIS IS FOR THE STATE. BUT SOME COUNTIES HAVE LOWER OR HIGHER NUMBERS. SCAN THIS QR CODE TO SEE THE TEACHING ASSIGNM

17% of California educators don’t have proper credentials to teach the class they’re assigned

A first-ever released report on teacher assignments found 83% of California’s educators have the proper credentials to teach their subjects, which means 17% do not, according to the California Department of Education. The Teaching Assignment Monitoring report was released on Thursday and broke down how many of California’s educators are qualified to educate in the subjects they teach in. The data is broken down by county, district and school from the 2020-21 school year, the department said.”Today’s release creates a baseline data set that will inform state and local decisions over the coming years as agencies work to address teacher shortages, a long-term national issue exacerbated by COVID-19,” the release from the department said. Statewide teacher assignments by the numbers:83.1% of teacher assignments are clear, meaning the class or course is taught by a teacher who has a credential and is fully authorized to teach the course.4.4% of assignments are out-of-field, meaning the teacher has a credential but has not demonstrated subject matter competence in the subject area.1.5% of classes or courses are taught by teachers with an intern credential, meaning the teacher is still completing their training or other credential requirements.4.1% of assignments are considered ineffective, meaning the teacher is authorized by an emergency permit, or holds a teaching credential but is teaching outside of their credentialed area without authorization, or holds no credential, permit, or authorization to teach in California.Sacramento County educators saw similar data, with 83.8% of educators teaching the classes they are qualified to teach. San Joaquin County only reported 75.5% and was the lowest in KCRA 3’s region to have educators teaching their class with proper credentials.You can find out how your county or district stacks up against the rest of the state here.“While this first-ever baseline data set shows that a vast majority of teaching assignments are properly filled, there is more work to be done to hire, train, and retain teachers, especially in light of the national teacher shortage,” said State Board of Education president Darling-Hammond. The Department of Education’s first-ever released data on teacher assignments comes after AB 1219 required the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing to create an electronic monitoring system for teacher assignments.

A first-ever released report on teacher assignments found 83% of California’s educators have the proper credentials to teach their subjects, which means 17% do not, according to the California Department of Education.

The Teaching Assignment Monitoring report was released on Thursday and broke down how many of California’s educators are qualified to educate in the subjects they teach in. The data is broken down by county, district and school from the 2020-21 school year, the department said.

“Today’s release creates a baseline data set that will inform state and local decisions over the coming years as agencies work to address teacher shortages, a long-term national issue exacerbated by COVID-19,” the release from the department said.

Statewide teacher assignments by the numbers:

    • 83.1% of teacher assignments are clear, meaning the class or course is taught by a teacher who has a credential and is fully authorized to teach the course.
    • 4.4% of assignments are out-of-field, meaning the teacher has a credential but has not demonstrated subject matter competence in the subject area.
    • 1.5% of classes or courses are taught by teachers with an intern credential, meaning the teacher is still completing their training or other credential requirements.
    • 4.1% of assignments are considered ineffective, meaning the teacher is authorized by an emergency permit, or holds a teaching credential but is teaching outside of their credentialed area without authorization, or holds no credential, permit, or authorization to teach in California.

Sacramento County educators saw similar data, with 83.8% of educators teaching the classes they are qualified to teach. San Joaquin County only reported 75.5% and was the lowest in KCRA 3’s region to have educators teaching their class with proper credentials.

You can find out how your county or district stacks up against the rest of the state here.

“While this first-ever baseline data set shows that a vast majority of teaching assignments are properly filled, there is more work to be done to hire, train, and retain teachers, especially in light of the national teacher shortage,” said State Board of Education president Darling-Hammond.

The Department of Education’s first-ever released data on teacher assignments comes after AB 1219 required the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing to create an electronic monitoring system for teacher assignments.

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