Coffee

Coffee Makers Made In USA (Not in China!)

If you’ve been looking for a coffee maker made in USA, you know they’re not easy to find. And to make matters worse, manufacturers seem to do their best to keep you confused. That’s why we decided to step in and do some serious research into which coffee makers are truly made in America. 

We found eight great options to suit all coffee lovers and all budgets. By buying any of these means, you’re supporting American workers, promoting local economies, and minimizing your environmental footprint. Plus, you’ll be enjoying delicious coffee!

The 8 Best Coffee Makers Made in USA

Unfortunately, it’s increasingly difficult to find products made in the USA and not made in China, but a few coffee companies are bucking the trend. Here are eight options spanning all styles of coffee makers.

No matter how you take your morning java, whether a smooth cold brew coffee or a creamy espresso, there’s a made-in-USA coffee maker for you!

Based in Portland, Oregon, Ratio Coffee was founded on the premise that automatic coffee makers deserve the same attention to design and craftsmanship that we see in the current crop of high-end espresso machines. 

So far, they have made two drip coffee makers, the Ratio Eight and its little brother, the Ratio Six, with a few variations of each (1). For example, you can opt for a glass or thermal carafe.

Both brewers are designed in Portland and have their components manufactured in Taiwan and China. However, each Ratio Eight is hand-assembled in Portland, whereas the Ratio Six is made in China.

The idea behind the Ratio Eight is to mimic how an expert barista would prepare a pour-over, including an automated bloom cycle. Except all you need to do is push a button. A die-cast aluminum heating element ensures the water is at the ideal brewing temperature. The water flows through a showerhead to ensure even wetting of the grounds for the best extraction.

The Ratio Eight borrows from the world of prosumer espresso machines in its design and choice of materials.

Available in white, silver, a muted grey called oyster, and matte black, the Ratio Eight is made from precision-machined aluminum, borosilicate glass, and hardwoods like walnut and parawood. No matter which finishes you choose, these are undeniably gorgeous American-made coffee makers.

Now the Ratio Eight is by no means a cheap drip coffee maker. But if you want something beautiful, functional, and made in the USA, you’ll definitely get your money’s worth.

2. BUNN BT Speed Brew – Best Drip Coffee Maker

Specifications

  • Made in: Creston, Iowa

  • Type of coffee maker: Automatic drip
  • Capacity: 50 ounces
  • Price: $$

If you want an automatic coffee machine that brews a great cup of coffee but don’t want to pay for the premium details of the Ratio Eight, the BUNN Speed Brew drip coffee machine is a fantastic choice. The Speed Brew is an upgraded version of the equally popular BUNN Velocity Brew found further down this list.

Both Bunn models are excellent drip coffee makers that deliver coffee quickly, but we recommend spending a bit more for the Speed Brew if the coffee quality is paramount. It’s also a slightly more attractive brewer, with smoother lines and a stainless steel finish.

The speed of the Speed Brew is due to its internal stainless steel hot water tank and accompanying 800 Watt heater, which can provide a perfect temperature of 200 ℉ brewing water on demand. The water is delivered to the coffee grounds via a showerhead, which yields a better extraction than the average cheap coffee machine. It takes just three minutes to brew a full 10-cup carafe, about half the time of most coffee makers.

The Speed Brew differentiates itself from the Velocity Brew with its stainless steel thermal carafe, which will keep your coffee hot for hours — no warming plate needed.

BUNN is headquartered in Springfield, Illinois. Though they source components for their machines worldwide, BUNN coffee makers are assembled in Creston, Iowa.

The Aerobie AeroPress Coffee Press is an incredible coffee maker. Period. In fact, this super affordable brewer is one of the best value coffee makers overall, not just among coffee makers made in the USA.

Made in Palo Alto, California, the AeroPress is the brainchild of longtime inventor and engineer Alan Adler. Fed up with trying to brew a decent single cup of coffee from a drip coffee machine, he set to work on an alternative, and the AeroPress was born (2).

So I drew a sketch and I made something in my shop. And it just tasted delicious. It tasted so much less bitter than regular drip coffee.

It’s an immersion coffee maker, similar to a French press. But it’s also different enough to yield a cup of coffee uniquely its own. Because of the faster brewing time and the paper filter, the coffee is less bitter and doesn’t have the oiliness or sediments present in a French press brew. Instead, you get a solid but clean-tasting cup of coffee.

A lot of AeroPress’s success is due to its widespread appeal. Beginners love it because it’s so easy to use. Serious coffee nerds love it because there are so many ways to tinker with the recipe. It’s popular with campers and hikers because it’s light and durable. There’s even an AeroPress World Championship (3)!

The only downside to AeroPress is its small capacity. It can be inconvenient if you’re brewing for a crowd. Technically, you can brew four intense, espresso-style shots at a time and dilute them into four coffees. But in practice, this brewer is best for serving one or two people at a time.

Cold brew coffee is so easy to make at home, there’s no reason ever to pay the exorbitant prices it commands at coffee shops (4). If you drink cold brew at a coffee shop more than five times a year, you’ve already paid for the Toddy Cold Brew System!

Toddy is a women-owned business based in Loveland, Colorado, where all their coffee makers are made. The Toddy Cold Brew System requires no electricity and uses a patented cold water filtration process to prepare a rich and highly low-acid coffee concentrate. 

Even if you’re not a cold brew fiend, you can still enjoy the low-acid coffee from this brewing system. Just dilute the concentrate with hot water instead for an ultra-smooth java perfect for anyone with a sensitive stomach. 

The concentrate stays fresh for up to two weeks, so we recommend keeping some in your fridge all summer long. That way when the cold brew craving hits, you’re well prepared and won’t be forced to spend big bucks at a cafe.

Cold brew lovers will be excited to learn that Toddy isn’t the only cold brew coffee maker made in the USA. There is also the Filtron Cold Brew Coffee Kit. Like the Toddy, it makes a low-acid coffee concentrate. The Filtron Cold Brew Kit is a bit more expensive but comes with a beautiful glass carafe in which to store your brew. 

At these prices, either one of these cold brew coffee makers would make a fantastic gift for the coffee lover in your life.

To be totally honest, the AeroPress is already a great coffee maker for travel. But if you’re in a situation where every bit of space counts, like you’re on a backpacking trip or only get one piece of carry-on luggage, then the AeroPress Go is what you need. Unlike AeroPress, it was actually designed with portability in mind.

In terms of operation, the Go is identical to the original AeroPress. It’s a speedy immersion brewer, with a plunger to force the brewed coffee through a paper filter. So it makes the same fantastic coffee Aeropress lovers have been raving about for years.

The most apparent difference between the two is that the AeroPress Go comes with a mug, which doubles as a carrying case for the whole kit. A snug silicone lid keeps everything in place for storage but be warned that it is not leakproof. This is a travel coffee maker, not a travel mug.

Aside from some minor, aesthetic changes, the other difference is that the AeroPress Go is a bit smaller than the original. If you already find the low capacity of AeroPress frustrating, the Go might not be for you. But if you only need to brew a cup at a time, and if you want to be able to do it anywhere, it’s hard to beat the AeroPress Go!

I’ll say this right off the bat. You can probably scroll right past this review if you don’t have an unlimited budget for coffee gear. 

Still here? Okay, then I’ll also say this. If you have the funds and a severe passion for espresso, Seattle-based Slayer espresso machines are easily the best American-made machines money can buy (5). They’ve won numerous awards and are found in high-end coffee shops around the world (6). 

The first thing you’ll notice about a Slayer espresso machine is its stunning design. These beautiful (and customizable) machines make a statement the same way your custom color Ferrari makes a statement. 

But just like the Ferrari, it’s what’s inside that really makes it so top-of-the-line.

The Slayer uses a patented needle valve to control water flow, which allows you to grind coffee finer without risking over-extraction.

Have you ever pondered just how flavorful coffee can be? This is how you can find out.

The Slayer Single Group also has double boilers, an electronic group head, PID temperature control, a rotary pump, and every other high-end option you can imagine.

The only potential pitfall is there’s no water reservoir. Like most commercial espresso machines, Slayers are designed to be plumbed directly to a water line. So be sure this makes sense in your home before you buy.

7. BUNN GRB Velocity Brew – Best for Fast Brewing

Specifications

  • Made in: Creston, Iowa

  • Type of coffee maker: Automatic drip
  • Capacity: 50 ounces
  • Price: $$

We’ve already talked about the BUNN Speed Brew. But if you want to save a little money, check out its cousin, the BUNN GRB Velocity Brew is its cousin.

Like the Speed Brew, the 10-cup Velocity Brew can have a full carafe ready in just 3 minutes. It uses the same internal stainless steel tank for hot water on demand. It also relies on the same showerhead brewing system and flat bottom filter, providing an even wetting of the grounds for optimum extraction.

The main difference between the two BUNN coffee makers is that the Velocity Brew uses glass rather than a thermal carafe. In my opinion, a thermal carafe is a worthwhile investment. It keeps your coffee hot without compromising its flavor or using any energy, and it’s more durable. But if you do opt for the Velocity Brew’s glass carafe, you’ll love its patented spill and drip-proof design.

The other differences between these American-made coffee makers are mainly aesthetic. The Speed Brew has a slightly more premium look and feels, with a sleek design and stainless steel. That said, this Velocity Brew is no slouch in the looks department, with a classic minimalist design.

8. Chemex – Best for Pour Over Coffee

The Chemex pour over coffee maker, with its glass carafe, wooden handle, and leather tie is the most iconic coffee maker made in the USA (7). Launched in the 1940s, you’re as likely to find one in a modern design museum as in a high-end coffee shop. And yet, it’s still affordable enough for any home brewer.

The Chemex is a pour over coffee maker that uses conical paper filters to produce a crisp and clean cup. If you love lighter roast coffees, you’ll appreciate the way Chemex highlights their bright acidity and complex flavors.

The emergence of the Third Wave coffee movement and the newfound popularity of light roasts brought the Chemex to the attention of specialty coffee lovers. One of the early adopters was Doug Zell, co-founder of the highly-esteemed Intelligentsia Coffee (8). He says:

It works well with our sweet, clean coffees, and I also think from a design standpoint it is simple and beautiful.

While the Chemex factory is still in Chicopee, Massachusetts, the only thing truly made there are the special Chemex filters. The Chemex itself is only assembled at the plant. The glass comes from Croatia and Taiwan, and the wood comes from Malaysia. The leather ties are American-made; they come from Tennessee.

How to Choose the Right Coffee Maker Made in USA

With so few coffee makers made in the USA, finding the perfect one is challenging. You certainly won’t be overwhelmed with choices, but the few options can feel limiting if you have specific needs. That’s where this buyer’s guide comes in, with everything you need to make the right decision.

Made In USA versus Manufactured In USA

Let’s start with a quick clarification. In most contexts, we can use the terms “made” and “manufactured” interchangeably, but this isn’t true regarding how the Federal Trade Commission classifies consumer goods.

For a product to be made in the United States, nearly all materials must come from the US. On the other hand, when a product is manufactured in the US, its components can be made overseas. They only need to be assembled in the USA. For this reason, it is far more common to find products labeled as being manufactured in the USA. Many companies also love to specify that their products are designed in the US before being produced elsewhere.

As a consumer, it is an admirable choice to buy a product made in the USA, especially as it is usually more expensive. Buying as close to home as possible supports local economies and workers and mitigates the impacts of transportation on climate change. And even if a product is only manufactured in America, you are still reaping these benefits to a lesser extent.

What style of brewer is for you?

There is a diverse array of coffee makers made in USA, so thinking about how you enjoy your coffee is an easy way to narrow down your options.

Do you like a clean cup or coffee with a light body? Do you generally prefer lighter roasts? Then you’ll probably prefer a pour over coffee maker, like the Chemex, or one of the automatic drip coffee machines. If you prefer coffee on the other end of the spectrum, with a bold flavor and heavy body, then you’re going to be better off with an espresso machine or AeroPress brew. Of course, if you like cold brew, the choice is easy; opt for a cold brew coffee maker.

You should also consider how much effort you want to put into making your coffee. Do you enjoy the process of getting up early and preparing the perfect cup? Then you might like a pour over coffee brewer, AeroPress, or espresso machine. Do you just want to roll out of bed and get some caffeine in your bloodstream ASAP? Then an automatic coffee maker or pre-prepared coffee concentrate will probably suit you better.

How much capacity do you need?

These coffee makers made in the USA span a vast range of capacities, from the 8 ounces AeroPress Go to 10-cup automatic coffee makers. When deciding which to buy, think about how much coffee you drink and how frequently. If you only make a cup or two a day, a small brewer like the AeroPress is perfect. If you and your family can quickly get through a carafe of coffee, a drip machine, or Chemex with a glass carafe makes sense. But if you like to drink cups throughout the day, a thermal carafe is a better choice.

What’s your budget?

The coffee makers in this list range from under $50 to close to $10,000, so knowing your budget is a helpful way to narrow down which made-in-USA coffee makers are right for you. We’ve used a rough price scale in this review round up to give you an idea of what you can afford.

$~<$100
$$~$100 – $300
$$$~$300 – $1,000
$$$$$1,000+

But do remember to take into account more than just upfront cost. Also, consider how long each product is expected to last, how much maintenance it will require, and what warranty the manufacturer offers.

The Verdict

It’s not easy to find coffee makers made in USA these days, but we dug deep to round up these eight options to suit all styles of coffee lovers. No matter which you choose, you can feel good about supporting American jobs, the local economy, and the environment. And just as important, you can brew great coffee.

Our top pick is the stunning Ratio Eight brewer, a coffee machine, and art piece. With just the press of a button, you’ll be enjoying a morning brew to rival any you can buy at a coffee shop.

FAQs

No, Keurig coffee makers are not made in the USA. Unsurprisingly, these low-cost plastic coffee makers are made in China and Malaysia. The K-Cups used in these coffee makers, on the other hand, are made all over the world, including the USA.

Yes, coffee is grown in the USA, but not in the continental US, at least not commercially. The only commercially grown coffee comes from Hawaii, which has just the right combination of climate and geography for Arabica plants to thrive (9).

The difference between coffee and espresso is how they are brewed, affecting the resulting drink. Espresso is made using finely ground coffee beans under high pressure, which produces the characteristic heavy body and creamy mouthfeel. Coffee is brewed without pressure, instead of using coarser grounds, more water, and a longer extraction time for a less intense drink.

  1. Bryman, H. (2019, April 8). A First Look at the New Ratio Six Coffee Brewer. Retrieved from https://dailycoffeenews.com/2019/04/08/a-first-look-at-the-new-ratio-six-coffee-brewer/
  2. Levy, S. (2015, March 16). First Alan Adler Invented the Aerobie. Now He’s Created the Perfect Cup of Coffee. Retrieved from https://www.wired.com/2015/03/first-alan-adler-invented-the-aerobie-now-hes-created-the-perfect-cup-of-coffee/
  3. Yentch, K. (2021, May 28). The World Aeropress Championship is Back. Retrieved from https://www.baristamagazine.com/the-world-aeropress-championship-is-back/
  4. Boydell, H. (2018, October 10). Cold Brew Coffee: Different Brewing Methods Compared. Retrieved from https://perfectdailygrind.com/2018/10/brew-methods-compared-how-should-you-make-cold-brew-coffee/
  5. Rosenberg, M. (2017, December 1). Seattle’s Slayer Espresso, maker of pricey espresso machines, bought by Italian coffee-equipment firm. Retrieved from https://www.seattletimes.com/business/local-business/seattles-slayer-espresso-maker-of-pricey-machines-bought-by-italian-coffee-equipment-firm/
  6. Luxury Lifestyle Awards. (2020). Slayer Espresso. Retrieved from https://luxurylifestyleawards.com/winners/coffee-maker/slayer-espresso-2
  7. Solano, F. (2015, May 28). Chemex – The History & Brewing Guide. Retrieved from https://perfectdailygrind.com/2015/05/chemex-the-history-brewing-guide/
  8. Clayton, L. (2015, March 10). Journey To The Center of the Chemex Factory. Retrieved from https://sprudge.com/journey-to-the-center-of-the-chemex-factory-72186.html
  9. Dible, M. (2018, August 1). A climate for coffee: Researchers work to get ahead of potential threats to Hawaii’s signature crop. Retrieved from https://www.westhawaiitoday.com/2018/01/08/hawaii-news/a-climate-for-coffee-researchers-work-to-get-ahead-of-potential-threats-to-hawaiis-signature-crop/



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