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Testing and vaccine info, case and hospitalization rates

AND CALIFORNIA. BRANDI: TURNING NOW TO OUR CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE. CALIFORNIA WILL DELAY THE CORONAVIRUS VACCINE MANDATE FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN UNTIL AT LEAST THE SUMMER OF NEXT YEAR. TEO: CALIFORNIA WAS THE FIRST STATE ATONNOUNCE IT WOULD REQUIRE ALL SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN TO RECEIVE THE COVID-19 VACCINE. BUT THE MANDATE WILL NOT TAKE EFFECT UNTIL FEDERAL REGULATORS GIVE FINAL APPROVAL. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERCEVI SECRETARY DR. MARK GHALY SAID SCHOOL DISTRICTS WOULD NEED RE ONCE GIVEN FEDERAL APPROVAL. STATE SENATOR RICHARD PAN TOYDA ANNOUNCED HE WAS HOLDING A BILL THAT WOULD HAVE BLOCKED STUDENTS FROM GETTING A PERSONAL VACCINE. IN A STATEMENT, PAN SAIDHE T STATE NEEDS TO FOCUS ON GETTING MORE CHILDREN VACCINATED BEFORE PRIORITIZING MANTEDA BRANDI: HERE IS A LOOK AT THE LATEST COVID CASE NUMBERS IN CALIFOIARN. THIS GRAPH SHOWS DAILY CASES OVER THE PAST 90 DAYS. THE TEST POSITIVY ITRATE IATS 1.8%. TWO MONTHS AGO, WE WERE OVER 7%. MORE THAN 1000 PEOPLE AREN I THE HOSPITAL WITH COVID STATEWIDE COMPARED TO MORE THAN 900IN0 EARLY FEBRUARY. MORE THAN 28 MILLION PEOPLE IN CALIFORNIA ARE FULLY VACCINATED. NEARLY 15 MILLION HAVE RECEIVED A BOOSTER SHOT. AS THE COVID NUMBERS CONTINUE TO GO THE COVID NUMBERS CONTINUE TO DOWN, THERE ARE SOME STILL GETTING THEIR FIRST DOSE OF THE VACCINE. AT THE SE TIME, OTHERS WONDERING WHEN TO GET THEIR SECOND BOOSTER. KCRA TALKED TO A LOCAL DOCTOR TO AN SWER THAT QUESTION. >> IT IS CHALLENGING NAVIGATGIN WHEN TO GET A SHOT AND WHEN NOT TO GET A SHOT. WE ARE DOING SECOND BOOSTERS. THE CDC HAS RECOMMENDED FOR ANY PATITEN OVER THE AGE OF 50 THAT THEY SHOULD GET THEIR SECOND BOOSTER. IF YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED YROU FIRST BOOSTER, THEY ABSOTELULY WANT YOU TO GET YOUR FIRST BOOSTER. BRANDIDR: WALKER ALSO SAYS YOU SHOULD BE GETTING YOURECD S BOOSTER IF YOU HAVE A COMPROMISED IMMUNE SYSTEM. AND THOUGH CASES HAVE DROPPED OFF, DOCTORS SAY IT’S STILL GOOD TO BE VACCINATED AND PEOEPL UNDER 50 WHO HAVE HAD THEIR FIRST BOOSTER ARE STILL PROTECD. TEO: THE FDA IS APPROVING THE FIRST COVID-19 BREATH TEST. THE AGENCY GRANTED EMERGEN UCY AUTHORIZATION TO THE INSPECT I.R. COVID-19 BREATHYZ.AL THE AGENCY SAYS THE TEST SPOTS CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS ASSOCIATED WITH COVID INFECTION AND CAN GIVE RESULTS IN LESS THAN THREE MINUTES. IT’S MADE TBEO USED IN MEDICAL OFFICES AND MOBILE TESTING SITES. IT’S ABOUT THE SIZE OF A PIECE OF CARRY-ON LUGGAGE. A STUDY FOUND THE DEVI ACCURATELY IDENTIFIED POSITIVE SAMPLES MORE THAN 91% OF THE TIME AND NEGATIVE SAMPLES NEAR

COVID-19 in California: Find testing and vaccine info, case and hospitalization rates, top COVID headlines

Below you’ll find information on the latest COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in California, where to get a COVID test, vaccine rates and booster shots, information on the omicron variant and the latest headlines — all in one place.App users, click here to see all the charts with this story. Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in California? COVID-19 testing should be free for individuals with few exceptions at COVID-19 testing sites licensed in California. Health insurance companies are supposed to cover the tests for their members, and the government pays for those who are uninsured.Click here for what you should know about getting reimbursed if you were charged.Here is where you can search for a testing site by address, city, county or ZIP code in California. For more information on testing, visit here.You can also now order up to eight at-home test kits per household through the federal government’s test website, COVIDtests.gov. They are expected to be mailed out seven to 12 days after your order.And private health insurers are being ordered to pay for up to eight at-home tests per person, per month.Here’s county-by-county COVID-19 testing information for KCRA 3’s coverage area:Sacramento County COVID testingYolo County COVID testingSan Joaquin County COVID testingStanislaus County COVID testingAmador County COVID testingTuolumne County COVID testingEl Dorado County COVID testingPlacer County COVID testingCalaveras County COVID testingNevada County COVID testingSutter County COVID testingSolano County COVID testingYuba County COVID testing| MORE | What to know about different kinds of COVID-19 tests| MORE | Here’s how to find free COVID-19 testing locations in Northern CaliforniaLatest COVID-19 cases in 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(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19 case and testing numbers).Latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in 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(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state) What we know about the omicron variantThe omicron variant of coronavirus was first detected in South Africa in November and has since raced across the globe, proving to be more highly contagious than the variants before it but also less severe.The variant was first detected in the United States from a traveler returning from South Africa who tested positive for the virus Nov. 29. By mid-December, omicron became the dominant variant in U.S. COVID-19 cases. Data suggests omicron symptoms may be different from previous strains. In a report from the CDC, patients with omicron generally had a cough, fatigue, congestion and runny nose.One doctor who has treated omicron patients in South Africa told the BBC in late November that people infected with the variant early on had “extremely mild symptoms.” Latest COVID-19 headlines California delays coronavirus vaccine mandate for schools | California is delaying a coronavirus vaccine mandate for schoolchildren until at least the summer of 2023. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration announced the change on Thursday. Bill nixing ‘belief’ excuse for school COVID vaccines dies | California parents should have an easier time getting their school-aged children excused from the state’s upcoming coronavirus vaccine mandate after a state lawmaker announced Thursday he would stop trying to block personal belief exemptions from the new rules. Pfizer to seek COVID booster for healthy 5- to 11-year-olds | U.S. health authorities already urge everyone 12 and older to get one booster dose for the best protection against the newest variants — and recently gave the option of a second booster to those 50 and older. Now Pfizer says new data shows healthy 5- to 11-year-olds could benefit from another kid-sized shot. COVID-19 cases trend up again in the US, driven by the growth of BA.2 | COVID-19 case numbers have begun to edge up in the United States, and nearly all of them are caused by the omicron subvariant BA.2. ‘Different levels of risk’: Some regions improve as much of Europe remains at the CDC’s highest travel risk | For the third week in a row, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention did not add a single new destination to its highest-risk Level 4 category for travel. With fewer cases and less demand, many COVID-19 testing sites are shutting down | As COVID-19 numbers reach pandemic lows across the United States, many COVID-19 testing sites have begun closing their doors. A powerful tool against COVID-19 is finally getting the attention it deserves, experts say | Two-plus years into the COVID-19 pandemic, you probably know the basics of protection: Vaccines, boosters, proper handwashing and masks. But one of the most powerful tools against the coronavirus is one that experts believe is just starting to get the attention it deserves: Ventilation.BA.2 is the dominant COVID-19 variant in the US. Here’s what’s known about it | The World Health Organization says it makes up about 94% of sequenced omicron cases submitted to an international coronavirus database in the most recent week. Community transmission in CaliforniaBelow you’ll find the levels of community transmission by county in California.Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?Californians can get their COVID-19 shots at community vaccination sites, doctor’s offices, clinics and pharmacies.You can find the state’s latest updates on covid19.ca.gov/vaccines and check the notification tool My Turn for information on eligibility and to schedule appointments. County health department websites are also a great tool for seeing what vaccine options are available. The state also promotes the online tool Vaccine Finder to help in locating a vaccination site near you.Pharmacy vaccine information:CVSRite AidWalgreensCan my child be vaccinated against COVID-19?In November, the CDC gave the final OK to approve Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11.The kid-sized dose is one-third the size of the adult dose and is administered with a smaller needle. Similar to the adult dosage, eligible kids will need to have two shots that are 21 days apart.Parents can book appointments for their child on MyTurn.ca.gov or call 833-422-4255.| MORE | Click here for more information on pharmacies providing the COVID-19 vaccine for your childYou can also check your county’s health department for more information on upcoming vaccine clinics.Sacramento CountyStanislaus CountySan Joaquin CountyYolo CountyPlacer CountyEl Dorado CountySolano CountyWill I need a booster shot?The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Nov. 30 strengthened its recommendations for who should get a COVID-19 booster shot.All adults should get a booster due to waning immunity, the CDC says.People immunized with Pfizer/BioNTech’s or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines should get a booster six months after they finish their first two doses.On Dec. 9, health officials said that 16- and 17-year-olds should also get a booster dose of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine.Anyone who got a Johnson & Johnson shot at least two months ago should also get a booster, the CDC said.California officials previously made similar recommendations.See the CDC’s information on boosters here.What should I know about the vaccines available to me?Moderna and Pfizer vaccinesHailed as vaccine game-changers for the medical community, health officials say both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are different than any other used for viruses such as the flu, measles or polio.Those COVID-19 vaccines have full approval from the FDA for individuals 18 years or older, and contain what is called messenger RNA, which is being used to create new types of vaccines to protect against infectious diseases.According to the CDC, “to trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein — or even just a piece of a protein — that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.” Johnson & Johnson’s vaccineOn Feb. 28, the Food and Drug Administration authorized Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine — the first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine available in the U.S. — for people ages 18 or older.The vaccine, made by Janssen, J&J’s vaccine arm, has been linked to a rare blood clotting syndrome.On Dec. 17, 2021, the CDC said that it preferred that people get mRNA vaccines made by Moderna and Pfizer.The CDC said that there have been 54 cases in the U.S. of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome or TTS in the U.S. since the J&J vaccine became available. Nine people have died — seven women and two men, CNN reported.How many vaccines have been administered in California?| MORE | How many doses have been administered by California county, ZIP codePGRpdiBjbGFzcz0ndGFibGVhdVBsYWNlaG9sZGVyJyBpZD0ndml6MTYzNjk4OTMwNzk5Nicgc3R5bGU9J3Bvc2l0aW9uOiByZWxhdGl2ZSc+PG5vc2NyaXB0PjxhIGhyZWY9J2h0dHBzOiYjNDc7JiM0Nztjb3ZpZDE5LmNhLmdvdiYjNDc7Jz48aW1nIGFsdD0nVmFjY2luZSAnIHNyYz0naHR0cHM6JiM0NzsmIzQ3O3B1YmxpYy50YWJsZWF1LmNvbSYjNDc7c3RhdGljJiM0NztpbWFnZXMmIzQ3O0NPJiM0NztDT1ZJRC0xOVZhY2NpbmVEYXNoYm9hcmRQdWJsaWN2MiYjNDc7VmFjY2luZSYjNDc7MV9yc3MucG5nJyBzdHlsZT0nYm9yZGVyOiBub25lJyAvPjwvYT48L25vc2NyaXB0PjxvYmplY3QgY2xhc3M9J3RhYmxlYXVWaXonICBzdHlsZT0nZGlzcGxheTpub25lOyc+PHBhcmFtIG5hbWU9J2hvc3RfdXJsJyB2YWx1ZT0naHR0cHMlM0ElMkYlMkZwdWJsaWMudGFibGVhdS5jb20lMkYnIC8+IDxwYXJhbSBuYW1lPSdlbWJlZF9jb2RlX3ZlcnNpb24nIHZhbHVlPSczJyAvPiA8cGFyYW0gbmFtZT0nc2l0ZV9yb290JyB2YWx1ZT0nJyAvPjxwYXJhbSBuYW1lPSduYW1lJyB2YWx1ZT0nQ09WSUQtMTlWYWNjaW5lRGFzaGJvYXJkUHVibGljdjImIzQ3O1ZhY2NpbmUnIC8+PHBhcmFtIG5hbWU9J3RhYnMnIHZhbHVlPSdubycgLz48cGFyYW0gbmFtZT0ndG9vbGJhcicgdmFsdWU9J3llcycgLz48cGFyYW0gbmFtZT0nc3RhdGljX2ltYWdlJyB2YWx1ZT0naHR0cHM6JiM0NzsmIzQ3O3B1YmxpYy50YWJsZWF1LmNvbSYjNDc7c3RhdGljJiM0NztpbWFnZXMmIzQ3O0NPJiM0NztDT1ZJRC0xOVZhY2NpbmVEYXNoYm9hcmRQdWJsaWN2MiYjNDc7VmFjY2luZSYjNDc7MS5wbmcnIC8+IDxwYXJhbSBuYW1lPSdhbmltYXRlX3RyYW5zaXRpb24nIHZhbHVlPSd5ZXMnIC8+PHBhcmFtIG5hbWU9J2Rpc3BsYXlfc3RhdGljX2ltYWdlJyB2YWx1ZT0neWVzJyAvPjxwYXJhbSBuYW1lPSdkaXNwbGF5X3NwaW5uZXInIHZhbHVlPSd5ZXMnIC8+PHBhcmFtIG5hbWU9J2Rpc3BsYXlfb3ZlcmxheScgdmFsdWU9J3llcycgLz48cGFyYW0gbmFtZT0nZGlzcGxheV9jb3VudCcgdmFsdWU9J3llcycgLz48cGFyYW0gbmFtZT0nbGFuZ3VhZ2UnIHZhbHVlPSdlbicgLz48cGFyYW0gbmFtZT0nZmlsdGVyJyB2YWx1ZT0ncHVibGlzaD15ZXMnIC8+PC9vYmplY3Q+PC9kaXY+ICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgIDxzY3JpcHQgdHlwZT0ndGV4dC9qYXZhc2NyaXB0Jz4gICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgIHZhciBkaXZFbGVtZW50ID0gZG9jdW1lbnQuZ2V0RWxlbWVudEJ5SWQoJ3ZpejE2MzY5ODkzMDc5OTYnKTsgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgIHZhciB2aXpFbGVtZW50ID0gZGl2RWxlbWVudC5nZXRFbGVtZW50c0J5VGFnTmFtZSgnb2JqZWN0JylbMF07ICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICBpZiAoIGRpdkVsZW1lbnQub2Zmc2V0V2lkdGggPiA4MDAgKSB7IHZpekVsZW1lbnQuc3R5bGUubWluV2lkdGg9JzUwMHB4Jzt2aXpFbGVtZW50LnN0eWxlLm1heFdpZHRoPSc4MDBweCc7dml6RWxlbWVudC5zdHlsZS53aWR0aD0nMTAwJSc7dml6RWxlbWVudC5zdHlsZS5oZWlnaHQ9JzUyN3B4Jzt9IGVsc2UgaWYgKCBkaXZFbGVtZW50Lm9mZnNldFdpZHRoID4gNTAwICkgeyB2aXpFbGVtZW50LnN0eWxlLm1pbldpZHRoPSc1MDBweCc7dml6RWxlbWVudC5zdHlsZS5tYXhXaWR0aD0nODAwcHgnO3ZpekVsZW1lbnQuc3R5bGUud2lkdGg9JzEwMCUnO3ZpekVsZW1lbnQuc3R5bGUuaGVpZ2h0PSc1MjdweCc7fSBlbHNlIHsgdml6RWxlbWVudC5zdHlsZS53aWR0aD0nMTAwJSc7dml6RWxlbWVudC5zdHlsZS5oZWlnaHQ9JzgyN3B4Jzt9ICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgdmFyIHNjcmlwdEVsZW1lbnQgPSBkb2N1bWVudC5jcmVhdGVFbGVtZW50KCdzY3JpcHQnKTsgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgIHNjcmlwdEVsZW1lbnQuc3JjID0gJ2h0dHBzOi8vcHVibGljLnRhYmxlYXUuY29tL2phdmFzY3JpcHRzL2FwaS92aXpfdjEuanMnOyAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgdml6RWxlbWVudC5wYXJlbnROb2RlLmluc2VydEJlZm9yZShzY3JpcHRFbGVtZW50LCB2aXpFbGVtZW50KTsgICAgICAgICAgICAgICAgPC9zY3JpcHQ+Vaccine Tracker: How many people have been vaccinated across the country? More questions answered with our Get the Facts on the Vax reportsKCRA 3 has taken viewer questions about the vaccine to health experts. If you have other questions, fill out our survey or send us an email at [email protected] the Facts on the Vax: Viewer questions answered about the COVID-19 vaccine for kids 5-11 Get the Facts on the Vax: Addressing fertility concerns with the COVID-19 vaccine Should kids about to turn 12 get the child’s vaccine dose? Kaiser doctor answers viewer questions Q&A: Doctor answers questions about COVID-19 vaccine safety for young children Are COVID-19 boosters the same as the original vaccines? Get the Facts on the Vax: Do you have to get multiple doses of the vaccine for it to be effective?Get the Facts on the Vax: When will the J&J vaccine be available for children 12 and up?Get the Facts on the Vax: Will I be charged for a COVID-19 vaccine?Get the Facts on the Vax: Why should I get vaccinated if I already had COVID-19?Get the Facts on the Vax: For how long will the vaccines be effective?Get the Facts on the Vax: Who should still be getting tested for COVID-19?Can COVID-19 vaccines affect my period?So you got the COVID-19 vaccine: 9 common questions answeredQ&A: Dr. Blumberg answers viewer questions about COVID-19 vaccine safetyYour guide to every COVID-19 vaccine questionYour COVID-19 Vaccine Questions: Facebook Live with Dr. Dean Blumberg, chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at UC Davis HealthCOVID-19 Vaccine Questions: Can I test positive after getting the shot? What if I’ve already had COVID? How to protect yourself from COVID-19Here is where you find the state’s latest information on COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.There are six ways to protect yourself and family, according to the California Department of Public Health:• Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.• Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.• Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.• Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.• Stay away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.• Follow guidance from public health officials.What are the symptoms of COVID-19? Per the CDC, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:Fever or chillsCoughShortness of breath or difficulty breathingFatigueMuscle or body achesHeadacheNew loss of taste or smellSore throatCongestion or runny noseNausea or vomitingDiarrheaThis list does not include all possible symptoms. The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:Trouble breathingPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusionInability to wake or stay awakeBluish lips or face Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.| MORE | Don’t overlook these omicron symptoms this winter, experts sayWho is most at risk for coronavirus?Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.— This Associated Press contributed to this report.

Below you’ll find information on the latest COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in California, where to get a COVID test, vaccine rates and booster shots, information on the omicron variant and the latest headlines — all in one place.

App users, click here to see all the charts with this story.


Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in California?

COVID-19 testing should be free for individuals with few exceptions at COVID-19 testing sites licensed in California. Health insurance companies are supposed to cover the tests for their members, and the government pays for those who are uninsured.

Here is where you can search for a testing site by address, city, county or ZIP code in California. For more information on testing, visit here.

You can also now order up to eight at-home test kits per household through the federal government’s test website, COVIDtests.gov. They are expected to be mailed out seven to 12 days after your order.

And private health insurers are being ordered to pay for up to eight at-home tests per person, per month.


Here’s county-by-county COVID-19 testing information for KCRA 3’s coverage area:

| MORE | What to know about different kinds of COVID-19 tests

| MORE | Here’s how to find free COVID-19 testing locations in Northern California


Latest COVID-19 cases in California

(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19 case and testing numbers).

Latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in California

(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state)

What we know about the omicron variant

The omicron variant of coronavirus was first detected in South Africa in November and has since raced across the globe, proving to be more highly contagious than the variants before it but also less severe.

The variant was first detected in the United States from a traveler returning from South Africa who tested positive for the virus Nov. 29. By mid-December, omicron became the dominant variant in U.S. COVID-19 cases.

Data suggests omicron symptoms may be different from previous strains. In a report from the CDC, patients with omicron generally had a cough, fatigue, congestion and runny nose.

One doctor who has treated omicron patients in South Africa told the BBC in late November that people infected with the variant early on had “extremely mild symptoms.”

Latest COVID-19 headlines


Community transmission in California

Below you’ll find the levels of community transmission by county in California.

Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Californians can get their COVID-19 shots at community vaccination sites, doctor’s offices, clinics and pharmacies.

You can find the state’s latest updates on covid19.ca.gov/vaccines and check the notification tool My Turn for information on eligibility and to schedule appointments. County health department websites are also a great tool for seeing what vaccine options are available. The state also promotes the online tool Vaccine Finder to help in locating a vaccination site near you.

Pharmacy vaccine information:
CVS

Rite Aid

Walgreens

Can my child be vaccinated against COVID-19?

In November, the CDC gave the final OK to approve Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11.

The kid-sized dose is one-third the size of the adult dose and is administered with a smaller needle. Similar to the adult dosage, eligible kids will need to have two shots that are 21 days apart.

Parents can book appointments for their child on MyTurn.ca.gov or call 833-422-4255.

| MORE | Click here for more information on pharmacies providing the COVID-19 vaccine for your child

You can also check your county’s health department for more information on upcoming vaccine clinics.

Will I need a booster shot?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Nov. 30 strengthened its recommendations for who should get a COVID-19 booster shot.

All adults should get a booster due to waning immunity, the CDC says.

People immunized with Pfizer/BioNTech’s or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines should get a booster six months after they finish their first two doses.

On Dec. 9, health officials said that 16- and 17-year-olds should also get a booster dose of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine.

Anyone who got a Johnson & Johnson shot at least two months ago should also get a booster, the CDC said.

California officials previously made similar recommendations.

What should I know about the vaccines available to me?

Moderna and Pfizer vaccines

Hailed as vaccine game-changers for the medical community, health officials say both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are different than any other used for viruses such as the flu, measles or polio.

Those COVID-19 vaccines have full approval from the FDA for individuals 18 years or older, and contain what is called messenger RNA, which is being used to create new types of vaccines to protect against infectious diseases.

According to the CDC, “to trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein — or even just a piece of a protein — that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.”

Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine

On Feb. 28, the Food and Drug Administration authorized Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine — the first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine available in the U.S. — for people ages 18 or older.

The vaccine, made by Janssen, J&J’s vaccine arm, has been linked to a rare blood clotting syndrome.

On Dec. 17, 2021, the CDC said that it preferred that people get mRNA vaccines made by Moderna and Pfizer.

The CDC said that there have been 54 cases in the U.S. of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome or TTS in the U.S. since the J&J vaccine became available. Nine people have died — seven women and two men, CNN reported.

How many vaccines have been administered in California?

| MORE | How many doses have been administered by California county, ZIP code

Vaccine Tracker: How many people have been vaccinated across the country?

More questions answered with our Get the Facts on the Vax reports

KCRA 3 has taken viewer questions about the vaccine to health experts. If you have other questions, fill out our survey or send us an email at [email protected].


How to protect yourself from COVID-19

Here is where you find the state’s latest information on COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.

There are six ways to protect yourself and family, according to the California Department of Public Health:

• Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

• Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

• Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

• Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

• Stay away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

• Follow guidance from public health officials.


What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Per the CDC, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms.

The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

| MORE | Don’t overlook these omicron symptoms this winter, experts say

Who is most at risk for coronavirus?

Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.

— This Associated Press contributed to this report.

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